Last edited by Zulkilrajas
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

7 edition of Labor problems and labor administration in the United States during the world war found in the catalog.

Labor problems and labor administration in the United States during the world war

by Gordon S. Watkins

  • 20 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by University of Illinois in Urbana .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Labor and laboring classes -- United States,
    • World War, 1914-1918 -- Economic aspects -- United States

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Gordon S. Watkins.
      SeriesUniversity of Illinois studies in the social sciences,, vol.VIII, no. 3-4
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsH31 .I4 vol. VIII, no. 3, 4
      The Physical Object
      Pagination2 v.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6629190M
      LC Control Number20019859
      OCLC/WorldCa4925022

        James B. Atleson, Labor and the Wartime State: Labor Relations and Law during World War II (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press ) JAMES ATLESON HAS a keen eye for continuities. Government regulation of war-time industrial relations, he argues, was not a temporary detour in the larger trajectory of New Deal industrial relations.   Soon, the Bureau was allocated $, to collect nationwide data on the cost of living. Conducted in –19, the survey cove families in 92 cities in 42 States. The results were published in the Monthly Labor Review in May Shortly thereafter, the Bureau issued its first comprehensive set of cost-of-living indexes for the.

      became most readily apparent during World War II, when the United States faced issues of both what to make and the question of who would make these products. Henry Ford and Henry Kaiser were a large part of the labor history of the United States, from the early File Size: 53KB.   Founding of the National Labor Union The NLU is the first national labor federation in the United States, dedicated in large part to fighting for the eight-hour day.

      By the end of the war, more than half of all industrial production in the world would take place in the United States. Wartime production boomed as citizens flocked to meet the demand for labor. Other sources of information concerning African American labor during World War I may be found in the Records of the Council of National Defense (RG 62), the Records of the U.S. Shipping Board (RG 32), the Records of the United States Food Administration (RG 4), and the Records of the National War Labor Board (NWLB)— World War I (RG 2.


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Labor problems and labor administration in the United States during the world war by Gordon S. Watkins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Labor problems and labor administration in the United States during the World War. [New York], [Johnson Reprint Corp.], [, ©] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Gordon S Watkins. Additional Physical Format: Print version: Watkins, Gordon S., b. Labor problems and labor administration in the United States during the world war.

With the entry of the U.S. into World War I on April 5,adequate war production became a national necessity and labor questions assumed paramount importance. Adding to the crisis atmosphere, labor-management conflicts became widespread as labor shortages and swelling production needs placed organized labor in a strong bargaining position.

The United States labor movement can credit -- or blame -- policies and regulations created during World War II for its current status. Focusing on the War Labor Board's treatment of arbitration, strikes, the scope of bargaining, and the contentious issue of union security, James Atleson shows how wartime necessities and language have carried over into a very different post-war world.

During the past decade so many changes have occurred in the American scene which affect labor that a new statement of our labor problem appears justifiable.

As these problems become more pressing, increasingly it is government which undertakes to deal with the difficulties facing workers, both employed and unemployed.

During World War II, labor unions in the United States: A) failed to gain any wage increases for their members. B) increased in membership. C) were abolished by congressional order. D) in general, refused to cooperate with the war effort.

E) agreed fully with the government's labor policy. Unlike World War I, the Department of Labor played a much smaller role in the World War II effort. It administered none of the special war labor agencies that were created.

Still its contributions were notable. The Bureau of Labor Statistics served as the research arm for the Office of Price Administration, the War Labor Board and the Armed Forces. The United States home front during World War II supported the war effort in many ways, including a wide range of volunteer efforts and submitting to government-managed rationing and price was a general feeling of agreement that the sacrifices were for the national good during the war.

The labor market changed on: United States. The labor history of the United States describes the history of organized labor, US labor law, and more general history of working people, in the United ing in the s, unions became important components of the Democratic historians question why a Labor Party did not emerge in the United States, in contrast to Western Europe.

Despite all the warnings of war, the United States wasn’t completely prepared when World War II broke out. The Depression had rubbed out many of the country’s machine and tool industries, the military was woefully under-supplied, and many soldiers found themselves drilling with toy guns and wooden tanks.

In a way, however, the Depression was [ ]. The post-Second World War purges of communists and other militants had a long-lasting effect on the U.S. labor movement. Just as the universe of the Cold War, which dominated global affairs from tocame tumbling down, the world of American labor turned upside down in the mids.

The post–World War II accord between capital and labor, which had produced a generation of sustained economic. Workers During the War To pay for the war, the United States ernment sold war bonds and taxes Then industries had to expand in order to produce war materials.

During this un however, there was a labor shortage. Millions of men left their jobs to serve in the armed forces.

Also, immigration slowed during the. McCartin (history, SUNY, Geneseo) has written a comprehensive account of American labor relations during the World War I era, bringing into sharper focus a period of union-management struggles that has not been dealt with as fully up to now.

His major theme is Cited by: Labor's Story in the United States will find its place on the shelves of scholars and students as an Indispensable read on the twin growth of labor and American democracy. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet Cited by: The history of work and labor in the United States reflects the change, discussed earlier, in economies from agricultural to industrial to postindustrial.

From the time the colonies began in the s until well into the 19th century, the United States was primarily an agricultural society, as people worked on their own farms, and the family. POST WORLD WAR I ISSUES. Ashley Many issues rose to the surface during the aftermath of World War I.

This time span, from towas filled with chaos and conflict. Three of the most eminent problems, ranking from the worst to the least problematic, were the issues of labor, the “red scare”, and racial tensions. This article is about songs of unionization, labor strikes, and child labor.

Union organizer and co-founder of the Industrial Workers of the World, Mary Harris Jones, also known as "Mother Jones." Select the link for more information about this photograph. Books shelved as labor-history: Stayin' Alive: The s and the Last Days of the Working Class by Jefferson R.

Cowie, A History of America in Ten Strike. A RUSA Outstanding Reference Title The Encyclopedia of US Labor and Working-Class History provides sweeping coverage of US labor history.

Containing over entries, the Encyclopedia encompasses labor history from the colonial era to the present. Articles focus on states, regions, periods, economic sectors and occupations, race-relations, ethnicity, and religion, concepts and 4/5(2).

The War Labor Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Labor, worked to resolve these problems in part by replacing male workers with female ones. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. (Respository for Department of Labor, War Labor Administration, Woman-In-Industry Service.).The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), members of which are commonly termed "Wobblies", is an international labor union that was founded in in Chicago, Illinois, in the United union combines general unionism with industrial unionism, as it is a general union, subdivided between the various industries which employ its philosophy and tactics of the IWW are Key people: § Notable members.Workers From World War I to the Civil Rights Act of By Judson MacLaury, Knoxville, TN, University of Tennessee (New-found Press),pp., $/paperback.

In his book To Advance Their Oppor-tunities, Judson MacLaury, former historian at the U.S. Department of .